Slaves of New York

Slaves of New York

Author: Tama Janowitz

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

Published: 1986

Total Pages: 292

ISBN-13: 0671745247

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Short stories of life in New York during the 1980's.


Book Synopsis Slaves of New York by : Tama Janowitz

Download or read book Slaves of New York written by Tama Janowitz and published by Simon and Schuster. This book was released on 1986 with total page 292 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Short stories of life in New York during the 1980's.


The Slaves of Solitude

The Slaves of Solitude

Author: Patrick Hamilton

Publisher:

Published: 1999

Total Pages: 225

ISBN-13: 9780141181646

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Book Synopsis The Slaves of Solitude by : Patrick Hamilton

Download or read book The Slaves of Solitude written by Patrick Hamilton and published by . This book was released on 1999 with total page 225 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt:


Slavery in New York

Slavery in New York

Author: Ira Berlin

Publisher:

Published: 2005

Total Pages: 403

ISBN-13: 9781565849976

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A history of slavery in New York City is told through contributions by leading historians of African-American life in New York and is published to coincide with a major exhibit, in an anthology that demonstrates how slavery shaped the city's everyday experiences and directly impacted its rise to a commercial and financial power. Original. 10,000 first printing.


Book Synopsis Slavery in New York by : Ira Berlin

Download or read book Slavery in New York written by Ira Berlin and published by . This book was released on 2005 with total page 403 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A history of slavery in New York City is told through contributions by leading historians of African-American life in New York and is published to coincide with a major exhibit, in an anthology that demonstrates how slavery shaped the city's everyday experiences and directly impacted its rise to a commercial and financial power. Original. 10,000 first printing.


The Slaves of Solitude

The Slaves of Solitude

Author: Patrick Hamilton

Publisher: Hachette UK

Published: 2017-01-12

Total Pages: 368

ISBN-13: 034914155X

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'All his novels are terrific, but this one is my favourite' Sarah Waters Patrick Hamilton's novels were the inspiration for Matthew Bourne's new dance theatre production, The Midnight Bell. Measuring out the wartime days in a small town on the Thames, Miss Roach is not unattractive but no longer quite young. The Rosamund Tea Rooms boarding house, where she lives with half a dozen others, is as grey and lonely as its residents. For Miss Roach, 'slave of her task-master, solitude', a shaft of not altogether welcome light is suddenly beamed upon her, with the appearance of a charismatic and emotional American Lieutenant. With him comes change - tipping the precariously balanced society of the house and presenting Miss Roach herself with a dilemma.


Book Synopsis The Slaves of Solitude by : Patrick Hamilton

Download or read book The Slaves of Solitude written by Patrick Hamilton and published by Hachette UK. This book was released on 2017-01-12 with total page 368 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: 'All his novels are terrific, but this one is my favourite' Sarah Waters Patrick Hamilton's novels were the inspiration for Matthew Bourne's new dance theatre production, The Midnight Bell. Measuring out the wartime days in a small town on the Thames, Miss Roach is not unattractive but no longer quite young. The Rosamund Tea Rooms boarding house, where she lives with half a dozen others, is as grey and lonely as its residents. For Miss Roach, 'slave of her task-master, solitude', a shaft of not altogether welcome light is suddenly beamed upon her, with the appearance of a charismatic and emotional American Lieutenant. With him comes change - tipping the precariously balanced society of the house and presenting Miss Roach herself with a dilemma.


In the Shadow of Slavery

In the Shadow of Slavery

Author: Leslie M. Harris

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

Published: 2023-11-29

Total Pages: 396

ISBN-13: 0226824861

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A new edition of a classic work revealing the little-known history of African Americans in New York City before Emancipation. The popular understanding of the history of slavery in America almost entirely ignores the institution’s extensive reach in the North. But the cities of the North were built by—and became the home of—tens of thousands of enslaved African Americans, many of whom would continue to live there as free people after Emancipation. In the Shadow of Slavery reveals the history of African Americans in the nation’s largest metropolis, New York City. Leslie M. Harris draws on travel accounts, autobiographies, newspapers, literature, and organizational records to extend prior studies of racial discrimination. She traces the undeniable impact of African Americans on class distinctions, politics, and community formation by offering vivid portraits of the lives and aspirations of countless black New Yorkers. This new edition includes an afterword by the author addressing subsequent research and the ongoing arguments over how slavery and its legacy should be taught, memorialized, and acknowledged by governments.


Book Synopsis In the Shadow of Slavery by : Leslie M. Harris

Download or read book In the Shadow of Slavery written by Leslie M. Harris and published by University of Chicago Press. This book was released on 2023-11-29 with total page 396 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A new edition of a classic work revealing the little-known history of African Americans in New York City before Emancipation. The popular understanding of the history of slavery in America almost entirely ignores the institution’s extensive reach in the North. But the cities of the North were built by—and became the home of—tens of thousands of enslaved African Americans, many of whom would continue to live there as free people after Emancipation. In the Shadow of Slavery reveals the history of African Americans in the nation’s largest metropolis, New York City. Leslie M. Harris draws on travel accounts, autobiographies, newspapers, literature, and organizational records to extend prior studies of racial discrimination. She traces the undeniable impact of African Americans on class distinctions, politics, and community formation by offering vivid portraits of the lives and aspirations of countless black New Yorkers. This new edition includes an afterword by the author addressing subsequent research and the ongoing arguments over how slavery and its legacy should be taught, memorialized, and acknowledged by governments.


Slaves in the Family

Slaves in the Family

Author: Edward Ball

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Published: 2017-10-24

Total Pages: 496

ISBN-13: 146689749X

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Fifteen years after its hardcover debut, the FSG Classics reissue of the celebrated work of narrative nonfiction that won the National Book Award and changed the American conversation about race, with a new preface by the author The Ball family hails from South Carolina—Charleston and thereabouts. Their plantations were among the oldest and longest-standing plantations in the South. Between 1698 and 1865, close to four thousand black people were born into slavery under the Balls or were bought by them. In Slaves in the Family, Edward Ball recounts his efforts to track down and meet the descendants of his family's slaves. Part historical narrative, part oral history, part personal story of investigation and catharsis, Slaves in the Family is, in the words of Pat Conroy, "a work of breathtaking generosity and courage, a magnificent study of the complexity and strangeness and beauty of the word ‘family.'"


Book Synopsis Slaves in the Family by : Edward Ball

Download or read book Slaves in the Family written by Edward Ball and published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. This book was released on 2017-10-24 with total page 496 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Fifteen years after its hardcover debut, the FSG Classics reissue of the celebrated work of narrative nonfiction that won the National Book Award and changed the American conversation about race, with a new preface by the author The Ball family hails from South Carolina—Charleston and thereabouts. Their plantations were among the oldest and longest-standing plantations in the South. Between 1698 and 1865, close to four thousand black people were born into slavery under the Balls or were bought by them. In Slaves in the Family, Edward Ball recounts his efforts to track down and meet the descendants of his family's slaves. Part historical narrative, part oral history, part personal story of investigation and catharsis, Slaves in the Family is, in the words of Pat Conroy, "a work of breathtaking generosity and courage, a magnificent study of the complexity and strangeness and beauty of the word ‘family.'"


New York Burning

New York Burning

Author: Jill Lepore

Publisher: Vintage

Published: 2007-12-18

Total Pages: 352

ISBN-13: 0307427005

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Pulitzer Prize Finalist and Anisfield-Wolf Award Winner In New York Burning, Bancroft Prize-winning historian Jill Lepore recounts these dramatic events of 1741, when ten fires blazed across Manhattan and panicked whites suspecting it to be the work a slave uprising went on a rampage. In the end, thirteen black men were burned at the stake, seventeen were hanged and more than one hundred black men and women were thrown into a dungeon beneath City Hall. Even back in the seventeenth century, the city was a rich mosaic of cultures, communities and colors, with slaves making up a full one-fifth of the population. Exploring the political and social climate of the times, Lepore dramatically shows how, in a city rife with state intrigue and terror, the threat of black rebellion united the white political pluralities in a frenzy of racial fear and violence.


Book Synopsis New York Burning by : Jill Lepore

Download or read book New York Burning written by Jill Lepore and published by Vintage. This book was released on 2007-12-18 with total page 352 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Pulitzer Prize Finalist and Anisfield-Wolf Award Winner In New York Burning, Bancroft Prize-winning historian Jill Lepore recounts these dramatic events of 1741, when ten fires blazed across Manhattan and panicked whites suspecting it to be the work a slave uprising went on a rampage. In the end, thirteen black men were burned at the stake, seventeen were hanged and more than one hundred black men and women were thrown into a dungeon beneath City Hall. Even back in the seventeenth century, the city was a rich mosaic of cultures, communities and colors, with slaves making up a full one-fifth of the population. Exploring the political and social climate of the times, Lepore dramatically shows how, in a city rife with state intrigue and terror, the threat of black rebellion united the white political pluralities in a frenzy of racial fear and violence.


Scream

Scream

Author: Tama Janowitz

Publisher: HarperCollins

Published: 2016-08-09

Total Pages: 280

ISBN-13: 006239133X

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In this darkly funny, surprising memoir, the original “Lit Girl” and author of the era-defining Slaves of New York considers her life in and outside of New York City, from the heyday of the 1980s to her life today in a tiny upstate town that proves that fact is always stranger than fiction. With the publication of her acclaimed short story collection Slaves of New York, Tama Janowitz was crowned the Lit Girl of New York. Celebrated in rarified literary and social circles, she was hailed, alongside Mark Lindquist, Bret Easton Ellis, and Jay McInerney, as one of the original “Brat Pack” writers—a wave of young minimalist authors whose wry, urbane sensibility captured the zeitgeist of the time, propelling them to the forefront of American culture. In Scream, her first memoir, Janowitz recalls the quirky literary world of young downtown New York in the go-go 1980s and reflects on her life today far away from the city indelible to her work. As in Slaves of New York and A Certain Age, Janowitz turns a critical eye towards life, this time her own, recounting the vagaries of fame and fortune as a writer devoted to her art. Here, too, is Tama as daughter, wife, and mother, wrestling with aging, loss, and angst, both adolescent (her daughter) and middle aged (her own) as she cares for a mother plagued by dementia, battles a brother who questions her choices, and endures the criticism of a surly teenager. Filled with a very real, very personal cast of characters, Scream is an intimate, scorching memoir rife with the humor, insight, and experience of a writer with a surgeon’s eye for detail, and a skill for cutting straight to the strangest parts of life.


Book Synopsis Scream by : Tama Janowitz

Download or read book Scream written by Tama Janowitz and published by HarperCollins. This book was released on 2016-08-09 with total page 280 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In this darkly funny, surprising memoir, the original “Lit Girl” and author of the era-defining Slaves of New York considers her life in and outside of New York City, from the heyday of the 1980s to her life today in a tiny upstate town that proves that fact is always stranger than fiction. With the publication of her acclaimed short story collection Slaves of New York, Tama Janowitz was crowned the Lit Girl of New York. Celebrated in rarified literary and social circles, she was hailed, alongside Mark Lindquist, Bret Easton Ellis, and Jay McInerney, as one of the original “Brat Pack” writers—a wave of young minimalist authors whose wry, urbane sensibility captured the zeitgeist of the time, propelling them to the forefront of American culture. In Scream, her first memoir, Janowitz recalls the quirky literary world of young downtown New York in the go-go 1980s and reflects on her life today far away from the city indelible to her work. As in Slaves of New York and A Certain Age, Janowitz turns a critical eye towards life, this time her own, recounting the vagaries of fame and fortune as a writer devoted to her art. Here, too, is Tama as daughter, wife, and mother, wrestling with aging, loss, and angst, both adolescent (her daughter) and middle aged (her own) as she cares for a mother plagued by dementia, battles a brother who questions her choices, and endures the criticism of a surly teenager. Filled with a very real, very personal cast of characters, Scream is an intimate, scorching memoir rife with the humor, insight, and experience of a writer with a surgeon’s eye for detail, and a skill for cutting straight to the strangest parts of life.


Slavery and Freedom in the Mid-Hudson Valley

Slavery and Freedom in the Mid-Hudson Valley

Author: Michael E. Groth

Publisher: SUNY Press

Published: 2017-04-17

Total Pages: 268

ISBN-13: 1438464576

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Explores the long-neglected rural dimensions of northern slavery and emancipation in New York’s Mid-Hudson Valley. Slavery and Freedom in the Mid-Hudson Valley focuses on the largely forgotten history of slavery in New York and the African American freedom struggle in the central Hudson Valley prior to the Civil War. Slaves were central actors in the drama that unfolded in the region during the Revolution, and they waged a long and bitter battle for freedom during the decades that followed. Slavery in the countryside was more oppressive than slavery in urban environments, and the agonizingly slow pace of abolition, constraints of rural poverty, and persistent racial hostility in the rural communities also presented formidable challenges to free black life in the central Hudson Valley. Michael E. Groth explores how Dutchess County’s black residents overcame such obstacles to establish independent community institutions, engage in political activism, and fashion a vibrant racial consciousness in antebellum New York. By drawing attention to the African American experience in the rural Mid-Hudson Valley, this book provides new perspectives on slavery and emancipation in New York, black community formation, and the nature of black identity in the Early Republic. “Groth provides a systematic overview focused on the history of African Americans in the Mid-Hudson Valley during the decades before the American Revolution through emancipation and during the national political struggle for abolition and the regional struggle for civil rights.” — Andor Skotnes, author of A New Deal for All? Race and Class Struggle in Depression-Era Baltimore


Book Synopsis Slavery and Freedom in the Mid-Hudson Valley by : Michael E. Groth

Download or read book Slavery and Freedom in the Mid-Hudson Valley written by Michael E. Groth and published by SUNY Press. This book was released on 2017-04-17 with total page 268 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Explores the long-neglected rural dimensions of northern slavery and emancipation in New York’s Mid-Hudson Valley. Slavery and Freedom in the Mid-Hudson Valley focuses on the largely forgotten history of slavery in New York and the African American freedom struggle in the central Hudson Valley prior to the Civil War. Slaves were central actors in the drama that unfolded in the region during the Revolution, and they waged a long and bitter battle for freedom during the decades that followed. Slavery in the countryside was more oppressive than slavery in urban environments, and the agonizingly slow pace of abolition, constraints of rural poverty, and persistent racial hostility in the rural communities also presented formidable challenges to free black life in the central Hudson Valley. Michael E. Groth explores how Dutchess County’s black residents overcame such obstacles to establish independent community institutions, engage in political activism, and fashion a vibrant racial consciousness in antebellum New York. By drawing attention to the African American experience in the rural Mid-Hudson Valley, this book provides new perspectives on slavery and emancipation in New York, black community formation, and the nature of black identity in the Early Republic. “Groth provides a systematic overview focused on the history of African Americans in the Mid-Hudson Valley during the decades before the American Revolution through emancipation and during the national political struggle for abolition and the regional struggle for civil rights.” — Andor Skotnes, author of A New Deal for All? Race and Class Struggle in Depression-Era Baltimore


The Last Slave Ships

The Last Slave Ships

Author: John Harris

Publisher: Yale University Press

Published: 2020-11-24

Total Pages: 313

ISBN-13: 0300247338

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A stunning behind-the-curtain look into the last years of the illegal transatlantic slave trade in the United States "A remarkable piece of scholarship, sophisticated yet crisply written, and deserves the widest possible audience."--Eric Herschthal, New Republic "Engrossing. . . . Astonishingly well-documented. . . . A signal contribution to U.S. antebellum historiography. Highly recommended for U.S. Middle Period, African American, and Civil War historians, and for all general readers."--Library Journal, Starred Review Long after the transatlantic slave trade was officially outlawed in the early nineteenth century by every major slave trading nation, merchants based in the United States were still sending hundreds of illegal slave ships from American ports to the African coast. The key instigators were slave traders who moved to New York City after the shuttering of the massive illegal slave trade to Brazil in 1850. These traffickers were determined to make Lower Manhattan a key hub in the illegal slave trade to Cuba. In conjunction with allies in Africa and Cuba, they ensnared around two hundred thousand African men, women, and children during the 1850s and 1860s. John Harris explores how the U.S. government went from ignoring, and even abetting, this illegal trade to helping to shut it down completely in 1867.


Book Synopsis The Last Slave Ships by : John Harris

Download or read book The Last Slave Ships written by John Harris and published by Yale University Press. This book was released on 2020-11-24 with total page 313 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A stunning behind-the-curtain look into the last years of the illegal transatlantic slave trade in the United States "A remarkable piece of scholarship, sophisticated yet crisply written, and deserves the widest possible audience."--Eric Herschthal, New Republic "Engrossing. . . . Astonishingly well-documented. . . . A signal contribution to U.S. antebellum historiography. Highly recommended for U.S. Middle Period, African American, and Civil War historians, and for all general readers."--Library Journal, Starred Review Long after the transatlantic slave trade was officially outlawed in the early nineteenth century by every major slave trading nation, merchants based in the United States were still sending hundreds of illegal slave ships from American ports to the African coast. The key instigators were slave traders who moved to New York City after the shuttering of the massive illegal slave trade to Brazil in 1850. These traffickers were determined to make Lower Manhattan a key hub in the illegal slave trade to Cuba. In conjunction with allies in Africa and Cuba, they ensnared around two hundred thousand African men, women, and children during the 1850s and 1860s. John Harris explores how the U.S. government went from ignoring, and even abetting, this illegal trade to helping to shut it down completely in 1867.